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  1. Defining the Edge Part 2: 4 Use Cases for Edge Computing

    Defining the Edge Part 2: 4 Use Cases for Edge Computing

    The IT industry has moved back and forth between centralized and decentralized models. The mainframe era gave way to client-server computing, then shifted back to the centralized approach with the rise of the cloud. Now, edge computing is decentralizing applications and data away from the corporate data center and the cloud. But edge computing is more than just another swing of the pendulum. Rather than replacing the cloud, it complements it, providing unique capabilities for specific use cases.

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  2. Defining the Edge Part 1: 4 Key Characteristics of Edge Data Centers

    Defining the Edge Part 1: 4 Key Characteristics of Edge Data Centers

    Edge computing helps to relieve network congestion and reduce data transport costs by conserving network bandwidth. It can also reduce cloud storage costs and improve regulatory compliance through data localization. According to the strictest definition, an edge data center is a facility in a secondary or tertiary market that’s not served by a major colocation center. In this context, the edge data center literally pushes out the Internet edge. More broadly, an edge data center can extend the corporate network to a remote location that lacks a traditional data center environment. In either case, edge data centers share these four characteristics.

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  3. How to Choose between Hot-Aisle and Cold-Aisle Containment in the Data Center

    How to Choose between Hot-Aisle and Cold-Aisle Containment in the Data Center

    Historically data center racks and cabinets are arranged in hot-aisle / cold-aisle configurations to improve cooling efficiency by reducing the mixing of hot exhaust air with chilled air from cooling units. However, air mixing still occurs when using this method, resulting in hotspots and higher energy costs. Aisle containment systems address this problem by fully isolating either the hot or cold aisles for greater efficiency and reduced operating costs.

    With hot-aisle containment, a physical barrier is constructed to direct exhaust airflow into the air conditioning return. With cold-aisle containment, the cold aisle is capped and doors are installed at either end to contain the cold air. Choosing the right approach depends upon several factors.

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  4. 4 Tools That Can Help You Remotely Manage Your Data Center

    4 Tools That Can Help You Remotely Manage Your Data Center

    The COVID-19 pandemic is highlighting the need for remote data center management amid travel restrictions and stay-at-home orders. While we touched on this topic briefly in a previous post, we’ll now drill down into some of the technologies that enable data center staff to operate remotely.

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  5. 5 Ways to Cut Cooling Costs in Data Centers

    5 Ways to Cut Cooling Costs in Data Centers

    Studies show that cooling and ventilation systems account for 30-55 percent of data center power consumption. Read about 5 techniques data center managers can use to improve cooling efficiency as data center densities increase.

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  6. Key Trends that Will Shape the Data Center Industry in 2020

    Key Trends that Will Shape the Data Center Industry in 2020

    As we rapidly go through 2020, one of the key questions occupying the minds of data center industry professionals is: What should the data center market expect for 2020? Data centers are under increasing pressure to keep up with advancing technologies and need to prepare and transform for what is to come. Here are some of the key trends that will shape the data center industry in 2020.

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  7. Top Three Root Causes of Data Center Outages

    Top Three Root Causes of Data Center Outages

    The thought of unplanned downtime strikes fear in the hearts of every data center operator. Standard operating procedures (SOPs), methods of procedure (MOPs) and site configuration policies (SCPs) should focus on the most critical workloads and the most likely causes of an outage. They should be reviewed and updated regularly, ideally by incorporating them into day-to-day operations.

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  8. Tips for Setting Up a Data Center Lab Environment

    Tips for Setting Up a Data Center Lab Environment

    Virtually every organization with in-house IT infrastructure has a use for a lab environment. For
    most IT organizations, the data center is much like an engineering lab — it’s the place where
    designs are proven out. The lab may be used to validate manufactured equipment
    specifications, system integrations or software upgrades before they are moved into
    production.

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  9. Key Considerations When Moving to a Co-Lo Environment

    Key Considerations When Moving to a Co-Lo Environment

    Data centers are expensive. Simply operating a data center requires ongoing expenditures for
    power, cooling, staffing and property taxes. If there’s a need to expand, substantial capital
    investments are needed to build out the additional space. Constructing a new data center
    would cost millions.

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  10. How 5G Will Impact Your Business and What You Can Do to Prepare

    How 5G Will Impact Your Business and What You Can Do to Prepare

    Wireless connectivity is now essential to business operations. For many employees, mobile
    devices have become the primary means of accessing the enterprise data center and cloud-
    based resources. 5G networks promise to accommodate this increasing demand by offering
    greater capacity expanded coverage and significantly faster speeds than are possible with
    existing wireless infrastructure.

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