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  1. Reducing Total Cost of Ownership with a Lithium-Ion UPS

    Reducing Total Cost of Ownership with a Lithium-Ion UPS

    The difference in the total cost of ownership (TCO) among the various types of UPS units can be substantial. Lithium-ion UPS units can deliver significant savings over traditional UPS units that use valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries. Although lithium-ion UPS units have a higher initial purchase price, that only accounts for about one-third of the TCO.

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  2. Why a Line-Interactive UPS Is the Best Choice for Your Data Center

    Why a Line-Interactive UPS Is the Best Choice for Your Data Center

    Even under normal utility operations, enterprise IT systems can be bombarded daily by conditions that damage critical components. So it’s important to select a UPS that offers more than just standby power, and line-interactive UPS units do just that! Learn why a line-interactive UPS is the best choice for your data center here.

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  3. The Benefits of a Lithium-Ion Battery UPS

    The Benefits of a Lithium-Ion Battery UPS

    According to research by the Ponemon Institute, uninterruptible power supply (UPS) failure is the number one cause of unplanned data center outages. Not surprisingly, battery failure is the primary cause of UPS problems. Lithium-ion batteries represent a smarter choice for data center UPS applications. Read more about the benefits of a lithium-ion battery UPS here.

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  4. 5 Business-Enabling Use Cases that Benefit from Edge Computing

    5 Business-Enabling Use Cases that Benefit from Edge Computing

    Edge computing was a growing IT trend even before the COVID-19 pandemic created a highly distributed workforce. Organizations are recognizing the need to push out applications and data closer to end-users and devices to minimize latency, reduce network bandwidth requirements, and enhance the user experience. Here are five use cases that leverage the benefits of the edge.

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  5. Edge Computing Increases the Efficiency of IoT Applications

    Edge Computing Increases the Efficiency of IoT Applications

    Edge computing is quickly becoming the next big thing for IT departments in the new world of remote working, but it can also help increase efficiencies when it comes to the Internet of Things (IoT) regardless of a business's remote worker needs. Read more about how edge computing can increase efficiencies...

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  6. 5 Applications for Machine Learning in the Data Center

    5 Applications for Machine Learning in the Data Center

    The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the pressure on IT teams to deliver highly reliable services to work-from-home users. At the same time, remote work has increased IT operational challenges, forcing IT teams to manage and maintain IT infrastructure without on-premises access. Machine learning offers a solution to both conundrums. In the data center context, machine learning can analyze information from IT infrastructure components to optimize operations. Machine learning systems can identify patterns that the IT team might not notice and solve problems faster than humans can. The technology also makes it possible to manage systems more efficiently and address potential problems before they cause downtime. Here are some applications for machine learning in a data center environment. 

     

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  7. 5 Reasons to Choose a Co-Location Facility That is Carrier & Cloud Neutral

    5 Reasons to Choose a Co-Location Facility That is Carrier & Cloud Neutral

    Choosing a co-location facility is no small task. While many organizations focus on power and cooling due to their direct relationship to costs, connectivity is arguably the most critical feature to consider. That's why it's crucial to choose a carrier- and cloud-neutral facility. Read "5 Reasons to Choose a Co-Location Facility That is Carrier & Cloud Neutral" blog post to discover why.

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  8. Defining the Edge Part 2: 4 Use Cases for Edge Computing

    Defining the Edge Part 2: 4 Use Cases for Edge Computing

    The IT industry has moved back and forth between centralized and decentralized models. The mainframe era gave way to client-server computing, then shifted back to the centralized approach with the rise of the cloud. Now, edge computing is decentralizing applications and data away from the corporate data center and the cloud. But edge computing is more than just another swing of the pendulum. Rather than replacing the cloud, it complements it, providing unique capabilities for specific use cases.

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  9. Defining the Edge Part 1: 4 Key Characteristics of Edge Data Centers

    Defining the Edge Part 1: 4 Key Characteristics of Edge Data Centers

    Edge computing helps to relieve network congestion and reduce data transport costs by conserving network bandwidth. It can also reduce cloud storage costs and improve regulatory compliance through data localization. According to the strictest definition, an edge data center is a facility in a secondary or tertiary market that’s not served by a major colocation center. In this context, the edge data center literally pushes out the Internet edge. More broadly, an edge data center can extend the corporate network to a remote location that lacks a traditional data center environment. In either case, edge data centers share these four characteristics.

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  10. How to Choose between Hot-Aisle and Cold-Aisle Containment in the Data Center

    How to Choose between Hot-Aisle and Cold-Aisle Containment in the Data Center

    Historically data center racks and cabinets are arranged in hot-aisle / cold-aisle configurations to improve cooling efficiency by reducing the mixing of hot exhaust air with chilled air from cooling units. However, air mixing still occurs when using this method, resulting in hotspots and higher energy costs. Aisle containment systems address this problem by fully isolating either the hot or cold aisles for greater efficiency and reduced operating costs.

    With hot-aisle containment, a physical barrier is constructed to direct exhaust airflow into the air conditioning return. With cold-aisle containment, the cold aisle is capped and doors are installed at either end to contain the cold air. Choosing the right approach depends upon several factors.

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